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Tracing the origins of digital developments within a domestic setting, Jenny Kennedy, Michael Arnold, Martin Gibbs, Bjorn Nansen, and Rowan Wilken advance media domestication research through an ecology-based approach to the abundance and materiality of media in the home. The book locates digital domesticity through phases of adoption and dwelling, to management and housekeeping, to obsolescence and disposal.

At the turn of the twenty-first century, typical households were equipped with a landline telephone, a desktop computer connected to a dial-up modem, and a shared television set. Television, radio and newspapers were the dominant mass media. Today, homes are now network hubs for all manner of digital technologies, from mobile devices littering lounge rooms to Bluetooth toothbrushes in bathrooms—and tomorrow, these too will be replaced with objects once inconceivable.

 

Tracing the origins of these digital developments, Jenny Kennedy, Michael Arnold, Martin Gibbs, Bjorn Nansen, and Rowan Wilken advance media domestication research through an ecology-based approach to the abundance and materiality of media in the home. The book locates digital domesticity through phases of adoption and dwelling, to management and housekeeping, to obsolescence and disposal. The authors synthesize household interviews, technology tours, remote data collection via mobile applications, and more to offer readers groundbreaking insight into domestic media consumption. Chapters use original case studies to empirically trace the adoption, use, and disposal of technology by individuals and families within their homes. The book unearths social and material accounts of media technologies, offering insight into family negotiations regarding technology usage in such a way that puts technology in the context of recent developments of digital infrastructure, devices, and software—all of which are now woven into the domestic fabric of the modern household.

Product Details

  • Publish Date: June 2020
  • Hardcover: 324 Pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Language: English
  • ISBN: 9780190905798
  • Available here

Reviews

“Through the combination of their studies conducted over 17 years, the authors provide a novel and nuanced perspective on the changing ICTs in Australian homes. In this panoramic yet detailed account, we see the reconfiguring of domestic space, reevaluations of technology over time, strategies to re-domesticate ICTs, and the ongoing parent-child re-negotiations of children’s use of digital devices. This is a thought-provoking book with which the reader can engage.” — Leslie Haddon, London School of Economics

About the Author

Jenny Kennedy is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT. From 2015 – 2017, she was a Research Fellow at University of Melbourne with the Impact of High Speed Broadband on Australian Home Life project, investigating broadband and domestic technology practices. Jenny completed her PhD in Media and Communication at Swinburne University of Technology. Her thesis examined norms of sharing in digital culture. Jenny’s research interests span social media, technology and the everyday, and material culture. Jenny’s current research investigates social media, ebook lending, and the domain names industry.

 

Rowan Wilken is a Principal Research Fellow and Associate Professor in the Technology, Communication and Policy Lab. His present research interests include mobile and locative media, digital technologies and culture, domestic technology consumption, theories and practices of everyday life, and the tensions between emerging and established media technologies. He is the co-editor (with Justin Clemens) of The Afterlives of Georges Perec (Edinburgh University Press, 2017), co-editor (with Gerard Goggin) of Locative Media (Routledge, 2014) and Mobile Technology and Place (Routledge, 2012), and author of Teletechnologies, Place, and Community (Routledge, 2011). At present he is working on two books: a research monograph, Cultural Economies of Locative Media (to be published by Oxford University Press), and an edited book (with Gerard Goggin and Heather Horst), Location Technologies in International Context (Routledge, 2018).

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